South African Snakes - Ask The Experts - Nature, Photography, Science, Snakes, Reptiles, animals - South Africa - Pepo

South African Snakes

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A channel about the snakes & snake rescue services in South Africa.

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South African Snakes.
Boomslang (Dispholidus typus) - venomous and very dangerous.

Wild Boomslang are difficult to photograph because they're so quick and they keep moving around.

I caught this one last week and was finally able to get some nice close-ups, though!
Willem Van Zyl 1 year ago
https://youtu.be/ilv3XDKB6FU

Boomslang (Dispholidus typus) - venomous and very dangerous.

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A couple of minutes after I released the Cape Cobra I caught earlier today, I was called out to a house in Melkbosstrand where the home-owners saw a Boomslang in a tree.

Apparently this snake had been around a couple of times over the past few weeks, luckily I was able to capture it quickly and move it somewhere safer.

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Boomslang are known for their strikingly large eyes - the largest of any African snake. Females are light to olive brown with dirty white to brown bellies, whereas males may have a variety of colors but usually present dark green on top with yellow bellies and black markings in-between their belly scales.

Shy and diurnal (active during the day), they spend most of their lives in trees and shrubs where they hunt eggs, birds, frogs, chameleons, and other tree-dwelling lizards.

Their venom is haemotoxic, which means that it affects the clotting mechanism in blood and leads to severe internal and external bleeding, or even haemorrhage if untreated. Although potent, the venom is slow-acting and may take more than 24 hours to produce serious symptoms - an effective anti-venom is available in some locations.

There are two common myths about the Boomslang: firstly, that they drop from trees onto people who walk by (they don’t), and secondly that because they’re rear-fanged they can only bite you on your little finger (they are rear-fanged, but can open their jaws 170 degrees and bite you almost anywhere on your body).

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Download our FREE “Snake Removal Pro” app to have instant access to your nearest snake catcher’s contact details, read frequently asked questions, watch snake rescue videos, and more:

http://bit.ly/snakeremovalpro

You can help us keep our wildlife safe! Even small donations help immensely:

http://www.bloubergsnakerescue.co.za/
Willem Van Zyl 1 year ago
https://youtu.be/u_d99735U1k

Cape Cobra (Naja nivea) - venomous and very dangerous.

*Please click on the button below to "Share" this post!*

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This is the first snake I caught after returning from my holiday in Limpopo this week - a Milnerton resident called me after they spotted it in their garden, and then kept an eye on it from a safe distance while they waited for me to arrive.

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Also known as a "Koperkapel" or "Geelslang" in Afrikaans, the Cape Cobra is a common venomous snake in our area that can range in color from yellow through reddish brown to black.

When threatened or cornered, it's quick to spread a hood and won't hesitate to bite. Cape Cobra venom is highly neurotoxic (the most potent of any African cobra), which means that it attacks the nervous system and causes respiratory collapse (the victim stops breathing), which in turn leads to suffocation.

As in most cases, this snake was doing its best to try and get away from us humans. Even though it's essential to be respectful of the danger that a snake like a Cape Cobra poses, if you give them room to escape they will always try to get away and hide - there's no snake in South Africa that will aggressively chase you.

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Download our FREE “Snake Removal Pro” app to have instant access to your nearest snake catcher’s contact details, read frequently asked questions, watch snake rescue videos, and more:

http://bit.ly/snakeremovalpro

You can help us keep our wildlife safe! Even small donations help immensely:

http://www.bloubergsnakerescue.co.za/
Cape Cobra (Naja nivea) - venomous and very dangerous.
Willem Van Zyl 1 year ago
Common Egg-Eater (Dasypeltis scabra) - harmless.

Relocated from a house in West Beach - full video here: https://youtu.be/KfEAHNxViA8
Puff Adder (Bitis arietans) - highly venomous.

It was unfortunately dead when collected, but made for a good opportunity to show how the fangs work.

Full video here: https://youtu.be/T-rGe6pUBW0
Cape Cobra (Naja nivea) - highly venomous. Relocated from a house near Milnerton, Cape Town, Western Cape.
From the channel header - Subadult Male Boomslang (Dispholidus typus). Seen near Eden On Big Bay, Cape Town, Western Cape.